Awareness of Daniel Navarro becomes slightly less dim

If I had to categorise Daniel Navarro, I’d class him as being ‘a cyclist whose name I know’.

If a Cofidis rider ever attacks on a climb, I reflexively think: “That’ll be Daniel Navarro,” because that’s invariably the line of commentary that follows. However, he wasn’t a rider I ever really thought about;  just someone who occasionally made his presence known to no great effect. Apparently he came ninth in last year’s Tour de France, but that completely passed me by.

The stage 13 finish was difficult. It wasn’t a mountain or anything. It was just a general uphill to the line with a fairly long steep section a couple of kilometres out. The steep bit was where Navarro attacked and while other escapees were easily reeled in by the favourites, Navarro’s urgent stamping – which looked too ferocious to be sustainable – kept him away for the win.

Dan Martin and Chris Froome both put in mini attacks as well, but the main guys all finished together.

Carlos Betancur watch

The kind of finish which has suited Betancur in the past, which meant that he finished 144th. He retains his slender 13 second advantage over Jimmy “Who?” Engoulvent to remain fourth from last.

Stage 14

Here’s the profile. A very Vuelta-ish finish sees an 8km final climb which occasionally tilts up above 20%. This is also the first of three summit finishes in a row. There will be some tired legs by Monday. It’ll be interesting to see who copes.